Art on Film | Summer Film Series

Put the art world in focus with Art on Film at SAM. Join us for award-winning documentaries, short films, and biopics that highlight some of our favorite artists, reveal untold histories, and explore what it takes to make it as an artist today. Each screening will include opportunities for discussion and connection among audience members.

 

Meet in the Sarasota High School Alumni Auditorium.

Sarasota High School Alumni Auditorium

Reserve your Spot

Marcel Duchamp

Marcel Duchamp: The Art of the Possible (2020)

Directed by Matthew Taylor
Running Time: 1 hour 26 minutes

Thursday, June 27

2 – 3:30 pm

$5 for Members 
$10 Not-Yet Members (includes Museum admission)

Marcel Duchamp: The Art of the Possible explores the life, philosophy and impact of one of the most influential early 20th century modernists, Marcel Duchamp. The film breaks down Duchamp’s ideas and applies them to both historical events and the modernist explosion that blanketed the early 20th century. The Art of the Possible isn’t simply a biopic; rather, the film shows how Duchamp’s ideas changed the public consciousness, and our understanding of aesthetics, art, and culture. The film highlights the singular impact of Duchamp’s philosophy on art, and, more importantly, examines how Duchamp’s revolutionary ideas from the early 20th century have shaped the 21st century and modern day.

Ultimately, Marcel Duchamp: The Art of The Possible is a guide to exploring the possibilities in every art endeavor and showcasing how Duchamp’s ideas gave generations of artists the intellectual backing to pursue new ideas.

Marcel Duchamp

Beyond the Visible: Hilma af Klint (2019)

Directed by Halina Dryschka
Running Time: 1 hour 33 minutes

Thursday, July 18

2 – 3:30 pm

$5 for Members 
$10 Not-Yet Members (includes Museum admission)

Hilma af Klint was an abstract artist before the term existed, a visionary, trailblazing figure who, inspired by spiritualism, modern science, and the riches of the natural world around her, began in 1906 to reel out a series of huge, colorful, sensual, strange works without precedent in painting. The subject of a recent smash retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum, af Klint was for years an all-but-forgotten figure in art historical discourse, before her long-delayed rediscovery. Director Halina Dryschka’s dazzling, course-correcting documentary describes not only the life and craft of af Klint, but also the process of her mischaracterization and erasure by both a patriarchal narrative of artistic progress and capitalistic determination of artistic value.

Marcel Duchamp

Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat (2017)

Directed by Sara Driver
Running Time: 1 hour 18 minutes

Thursday, August 29

2 – 3:30 pm

$5 for Members 
$10 Not-Yet Members (includes Museum admission)

Boom for Real explore the pre-fame years of the celebrated American artist Jean Michel Basquiat, and how New York City, its people, and its tectonically shifting arts culture of the late 1970’s and 80”s shaped his vision.

Marcel Duchamp

The Price of Everything (2019)

Directed by Nathaniel Kahn
Running Time: 1 hour 38 minutes

Thursday, August 29

2 – 3:30 pm

$5 for Members 
$10 Not-Yet Members (includes Museum admission)

Exploring the labyrinth of the contemporary art world, The Price of Everything examines the role of art and artistic passion in today’s money-driven, consumer-based society. Featuring collectors, dealers, auctioneers and a rich range of artists, from current market darlings Jeff Koons, Gerhard Richter and Njideka Akunyili Crosby, to one-time art star Larry Poons, the film exposes deep contradictions as it holds a mirror up to contemporary values and times, coaxing out the dynamics at play in pricing the priceless.

Are we in the midst of an art crisis? Can the value of art really be measured in dollars and cents? How are these values assigned and who assigns them? Does the art market have a chilling effect on our great museums and the ability of the public to engage in the art of our time? Most importantly, what does this new consumerist approach to art mean for artists themselves?

Weekly Programs